Newsletter

CHRISTINE SUNDERLAND INTERVIEW: On the Psalms

In Father Hines’ interview with author Christine Sunderland, she remarked how one of her favorite authors’ criticisms was that her sentences were sometimes too long.  Then, also commenting that Christine’s father was a Protestant minister, attributed the writing style to the influence of the Psalms – the “rhythm and the dance that becomes a part of you, a kind of life poem”.
“The Psalms are fabulous – some of them are pretty scary” reminding us that we reap what we sew, the last ones, in particular  is about “burning cities”.
Father responded that the justice of God is to give you what you want, but the mercy of God saves us from destroying ourselves.
He cited that Israel was led into captivity as an instance of travail and suffering.  While a severe tonic, it was meant to spare the people from a worse fate.
PSALM 137

1 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.

2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.

3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.

4 How shall we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?

5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

6 If I do not remember

thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy.

7 Remember, O Lord, the children of Edom in the day of Jerusalem; who said, Rase it, rase it, even to the foundation thereof.

8 O daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed; happy shall he be, that rewardeth thee as thou hast served us

9 Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.

 

Click to listen:

Part 3 Fr. Hines’ Interview with Christine Sunderland – The Psalms

Christine Sunderland Telephone Interview, January 22, 2013

Father Hines conducted this friendly telephone visit with Christine on January 22, 2013.  The discussion included commentary about her books, her blogs, the importance of our Sacramental heritage  – including the comforts of traditional music and food as an important treasure in our lives.


The interview is offered here in sections, for ease of listening.  For a complete copy of the interview, please contact Ginny Deering.

Christine Sunderland is a well-known novelist from the San Francisco Bay Area. Her stories, set in Europe and Hawaii, draw from the past but are set in the present, and deal with themes of love, suffering, faith, and family.  She draws from her rich tradition in the Anglican Church, and the rich language and meter of the liturgy illuminate her prose and plots.

Her first three novels are a trilogy based on faith, hope, redemption and love, experienced through the Anglo-Catholic tradition.  The stories are born from her travels as she explored the history of Christianity from a sacramental point of view. She comments about our liturgical and sacramental tradition: “We have a fullness others do not have”.

The first novel of the trilogy, Pilgramage is based in Italy.  Middle-aged history professor Madeleine Seymour… is haunted by the death of her young daughter Mollie, who drowned in a plastic pool. Tormented by nightmares… Madeleine seeks the counsel of Father Rinaldi, who sends Madeleine and her husband Jack on a trip to Italy to its Catholic shrines… With its iconography of blood and sacrifice, its stories of suffering and death transmuted into hope and rebirth, it reveals lessons for coping with her long-festering grief and guilt. Balancing spiritual exaltation with psychological realism, Sunderland’s limpid prose makes Madeleine’s journey both gripping and believable.  It is a moving study of the healing power of religious devotion.”

Pilgrimage

In Offering, Madeleine and her husband Jack scour France on an anxious search for the doctor who may save Jack’s life. Meanwhile that same doctor, Rachelle DuPres, treks throughout the country on her own quest for spiritual healing. In the second of Christine Sunderland’s inspirational fiction trilogy, Offerings invites the reader to travel alongside these ailing souls as they search for healing, truth and salvation.

Christine comments: “God speaks through actions to provide healing through physical means, providing spiritual epiphanies.”  France, historically overrun by other cultures: Germany, England and the East – the Holocaust being the most recent example – provides a significant setting.

The interview includes a special discussion about the significance of the story of Bernadette is included in the recording and should not be missed.

Offerings

 

The trilogy concludes with Inheritance, set in London, England and its surrounding towns.  She reminds us that we understand huge truths in the forms of the Book of Common Prayer and the King James Version of the Bible.  The sacraments, liturgy and hymns of our tradition reveal hidden secrets that we can’t afford to lose and must be passed on to our children.

Inheritance

 

Father and Ms. Sunderland concluded with a very touching look at how the Sacraments work and continue to work in our Anglican lifestyle.

Anglicanism

Feast of St, Thomas, Apostle

Feast of St. Thomas, Apostle & Martyr
December 21, 2012 
COAT DRIVE SUCCESS!
by Parishoner Becky Heerema 
Coats for the Holidays
St George’s parishoners come through with 39 coates for
Eisenberg Elementary School

The coat drive has been a huge success and a blessing to many families right in our neighborhood! Tuesday afternoon, we delivered 39 coats for girls and boys from St. George’s and 39 coats for boys from Word of Life Academy to Eisenberg Elementary School. The principal, school counselor, and office manager were very thankful and anxious to start passing them out to students.

They had requested enough coats to cover their most needy students’ siblings as well, to include a foster family with two new students starting school that very day, and a family of seven children who will all have warm coats by the time this message reaches your home! The coats still keep coming, so we will be able to meet the same need at Molasky Middle School before they close for the holiday.

Our St. George’s congregation is truly blessed abundantly, not only with material things, but with hearts to share. Some of the children in our parish family opted to purchase coats for the schools instead of buying presents for each other this Christmas! This will no doubt come back to them in the joy of giving.

We are closing the coat campaign as we have met our goal! Thanks be to God!  We look ahead for other opportunities to help in the New Year. Thank you to all who participated and to all who supported the effort in prayer!

Sincerely in Christ, Becky Heerema

SUNDAY SCHOOL CHRISTMAS PAGEANT UPDATE
By parishoner Kim Jones 
Pageant Rehearsal

Practice went very well last Sunday, and the Pageant will be great!

SUNDAY SCHOOL CHRISTMAS PAGEANT

Next Sunday, December 23, after 10:30 Mass    

Our annual Christmas Pageant has been ‘annual’ since my mom, Martha Tracey, started it back in about 1998.  I took over about 12 years ago.  Each year the characters are played by different children and they all get a chance to play different parts each year.  Jolie Heerema is Gabriel this year, but we call her ‘Gabriella’, and Hailey Oliver is Mary.

 Brandon, Joe, and James will be narrators and there are many, many more kids involved.  The costumes were hand made by Martha – they are basic and sweet.  This year, we have been blessed once again to have some teens come out of Pageant retirement and play the part of the camels…very tall camels.  We will enjoy some music from the choir featuring short exerpts from O Come All Ye Faithful, O Come O Come Emmanuel, and many more.

This is one of our biggest Sunday School lessons of the year.  The children have the opportunity to act out the Story of Our Lord and Savior’s birth.  They have worked hard all through Advent to prepare this for the congregation and they have made me very proud.

THE FESTIVAL OF NINE LESSONS AND CAROLS
Next Sunday, December 23, 5:00 pm, followed by Reception 
St. George's Choir
Judith Greer and the St. George’s Anglican Choir

Every year, the music is exceptional and memorable; however, this year will be very special.  St. George’s choir has some beautiful traditional music for us this year, led by Music Director Thom Greathouse.

 

We’re expecting a great crowd, so come early!

 

Thanks to all those who have worked so hard to prepare for this year’s event and to those who are contributing to the reception.

CHRISTMAS EVE MASS
Christmas Eve Mass
Welcome Christ into your Christmas at the Christmas Eve Choral Mass, Monday, December 24, at 11:00 pm.  
CHRISTMAS MORNING MASS
Christmas Day
Welcome Christ into your life this Christmas Day.  The peace and inspiration of this service will feed your spirit all week long.
ADVENT PRAYER

Advent Wreath

Let not our souls be busy inns that have no room for thee and thine, but quiet homes of prayer and praise, where thou mayest find fit company, where the needful cares of life are wisely ordered and put away, and wide, sweet spaces kept for thee, where holy thoughts pass up and down, and fervent longings watch and wait thy coming.

 

Fourth Week of Advent

Advent is a Penitential Season, like Lent; therefore, altar flowers 
are not used during the Advent season except on the third (Rose).   

 

Liturgy for Lighting the Candles    

A member of the family lights one or more candles of the Advent wreath, depending on the Sunday in Advent

.


Leader:

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.

All: Thanks be to God.
Leader:
Rejoice – The Lord is at hand.
All:
Come, Lord Jesus!

Leader: Reads Scripture passage for the day (see list below) and concludes with “Here endeth the lesson.”

All: Thanks be to God.

Leader: Rejoice – The Lord is at hand.
All:
Come, Lord Jesus!

Leader: Reads Scripture passage for the day (see list) and concludes with “Here endeth the lesson.”

All: Thanks be to God

Blessing of the Advent Wreath

On the first Sunday in Advent the leader asks God’s blessing on the wreath with the following words:     O Lord, by Whose Word all things are sanctified; pour forth Thy blessings upon this wreath of green, and grant that we who use it may prepare our hearts for the coming of Christ, and may receive Thy abundant grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Leader: Let us pray
All: Visit, O Lord, this habitation and this family; drive far from it all snares of the enemy, let Thy holy angels dwell herein to preserve us in peace, and let Thy blessing be ever upon us, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

 

Leader: The almighty and merciful Lord, Father, Son, and Holy

Ghost, bless us and keep us. Amen.

 

The Collect

 

Prayer for the Fourth Sunday of Advent

 

O LORD, raise up, we pray thee, thy power, and come among us, and with great might succor us; that whereas, through our sins and wickedness, we are sore let and hindered in running the race that is set before us, thy bountiful grace and mercy may speedily help and deliver us; through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom, with thee and the Holy Ghost, be honour and glory, world without end. Amen. 

Visit, O Lord, this habitation and this family; drive far from it all snares of the enemy, let Thy holy angels dwell herein to preserve us in peace, and let Thy blessing be ever upon us, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

ALMIGHTY God, give us grace that we may cast off the works of darkness, and put upon us the armour of light, now in the time of this mortal life, in which thy Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious majesty to judge both the quick and the dead, we may rise to the life immortal, through him who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, now and ever. Amen.

Leader: The almighty and merciful Lord, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, bless us and keep us. Amen. 


At the end of the meal all of the candles are extinguished.

Suggested Scripture Readings for Advent Week 4, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day

Sunday:  John 5:37-47  
Monday (Christmas Eve):  Luke 1:26-38  
Tuesday:  (Christmas Day) Matthew 1:18-25
Wednesday Luke 1:39-56 
Thursday: Luke 1:57-80  
Friday:  Matthew 2:16-23   
FEAST OF ST. STEPHEN
THE PROTOMARTYR
Friday, December 21
St.James

Evening Prayer: 5:45 pm
Mass: 6:00 pm

The Feast of St. Stephen falls on the second day of Christmas. The first Christian martyr, he was stoned outside Jerusalem, and died praying for his executioners. 

 

One of the seven deacons who helped the apostles, he was “filled with faith and with the Holy Spirit,” and was “full of fortitude.” 

 

The Church draws a comparison between the disciple and his Master, emphasizing the imitation of Christ even unto the complete gift of self.

FEAST OF THE
HOLY INNOCENTS
Friday, December 28 
Holy Innocents
 

Evening Prayer 5:45 pm 

Mass: 6:00 pm

 

December 28 is the feast of the Holy Innocents. This festival commemorates King Herod’s slaughter of all the boy-children in Judea in order to ensure that promised Messiah would not pose a threat to his throne.  

 

No parent can look at his own child this day and fail to know the anguish of these parents. It is the Innocents’ parents one remembers when standing over the bed of a fevered child keeping a night’s vigil, or when reflecting on the loss of innocent children at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

 

 We are called as well to pray for all the unborn children around the world, that their lives would be preserved.

 

At one time this feast day was known in England as Childermas Day, and was a day of mourning when the churches ran a muffled peal of bells. 

FEAST OF THE CIRCUMCISION
OF OUR LORD
Tuesday, January 1
Feast of the Circumcision of our Lord

 

Evening Prayer: 5:45 pm

Mass: 6:00 pm  

 

The 1st day of January is the eighth day of the Nativity of Our Lord (i.e., from December 25 to January 1, inclusive, are 8 days).

This day is the Feast of the Circumcision. It is a Holy Day of Obligation on which we must attend Mass. On this day, we recall Our Lord’s submitting to the Mosaic Law by getting circumcised on the 8th day of His human life in obedience to the Law (Genesis 17:10-12). 

Newsletter for the Feast of St. Andrew the Apostle

THE FEAST OF ST. ANDREW, THE APOSTLE

NOVEMBER 30


Contributed by Parishoner Connie Cummings

St. Andrew the Apostle

St. Andrew the Apostle El Greco 1606 - Oil on Canvas Museo del Greco - Toledo

Andrew was born in Bethsaida in Galilee, son of Jona and brother of Simon Peter. The three were fishermen on Lake Tiberius (the Sea of Galilee).

Andrew first met Jesus in Bethany where John the Baptist was baptizing. John 1:35-42 tells the story of Jesus walking by with 2 disciples and Andrew recognized Him as the Savior saying, “Look, this is the Lamb of God.” Andrew went to tell his brother right away and brought him to Jesus. The brothers kept on with their fishing at that time, but when John was imprisoned and Jesus went to live in Capernaum, the two “dropped their nets immediately and followed Him.” Mt. 4:17-20

From then on, Andrew is not mentioned individually in the Gospel (though he was the one who told Jesus about the boy with the 5 loaves and two fishes in the feeding of the 5000, Jn. 6:8).

After the crucifixion, tradition says Andrew carried the Gospel into districts around the Black Sea and died at Patras in Achaia on an X-shaped cross. This kind of cross was named after him.

Andrew is the patron saint of fishermen and women wishing to have children.

Source: Lives of the Saints by Omer Englebert


KAIROS, CHRONOS AND CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS


The Very Rev. Canon Bartholomew G. Ryan Rector, The Anglican Church of Saint Dunstan

The Very Rev. Canon Bartholomew G. Ryan Rector, The Anglican Church of Saint Dunstan

Here is an article I found edifying and I recommend it to each of you for reading during the season of Advent.  It comes to us from Fr.Ryan, a friend of Judith and Fr. Greer. He is the Rector of an Anglican church in a parallel jurisdiction.
Fr. Hines+

“This is now the second letter that I have written to you, beloved, and in both of them I have aroused your sincere mind by way of reminder; that you should remember the predictions of the holy prophets and the commandment of the Lord and Savior through your apostles. First of all you must understand this, that scoffers will come in the last days with scoffing, following their own passions and saying, “Where is the promise of his coming? For ever since the fathers fell asleep, all things have continued as they were from the beginning of creation.” They deliberately ignore this fact, that by the word of God heavens existed long ago, and an earth formed out of water and by means of water, through which the world that then existed was deluged with water and perished. But by the same word the heavens and earth that now exist have been stored up for fire, being kept until the day of judgment and destruction of ungodly men. But do not ignore this one fact, beloved, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. 

II Peter 3:1-8

From the beginning of philosophy the nature of matter, space and time have fascinated human beings. As religious expression ended into the conversation our origins as human beings and our ultimate destination became intertwined with thoughts about time and space and matter. Science offered to us additional information about the nature of time and our human bodies. Circadian Rhythms note how the hours of daylight and darkness affect our health and mental acuity; individually we keep our own time.

So what has this philosophical and medical discussion have to do with the Season of Advent? When we consider what we are to do, the preparations we need to make and how that work is to be accomplished it would appear that time is connected to all of this work.

First, Holy Mother Church has given us a Season of Preparation. A time when we can reorder our biological clocks and the chronological time within we live with God’s Eternal Time. We use the terms, Kairos to represent the God’s Time. It is an ancient Greek word meaning the “right or opportune moment.” Kairos is time that is not flowing as Chronological time, but represents the eternal now when all things are present to God who is not bound by time and space as we are. God created matter, time and space so God’s Time is about the eternal moments that are not measured or measurable. The moment of the Incarnation and the Nativity are but two of these events we ponder during this season

of Advent. These two moments when Kairos Time and Chronological time touched, when the Divine Nature entered into time and space to share our existence.

The importance of this entering into our time of God cannot be underestimated and may not be dismissed by the Christian Disciple. The Gospels of Matthew and Luke are so careful in their record of the Incarnation and Birth of the Lord to place the event for us in chronological time. This both identifies the historical nature of the event and gives us insight as to how we shall prepare for and celebrate these events.

These are for the People of God, moments when God’s Time, historical time and moments of the individual lives of ordinary people all converged. In those moments time, space and matter all became fluid as God’s Mighty Acts are revealed to us in a time and a form that we can recognize.

In this season when we are to be preparing for and remembering the coming of the Christ of God, perhaps meditating upon one of His Holy Sacrament of the Altar may be a clearest way for us to ponder the mystery and enter into the moment. In the celebration of the Mass we enter into God’s Time, we do not leave the ordinary, but we are allowed to take with us every moment of our lives. We are to take the gifts we have been given in time and space the matter of bread and wine, our gifts and talents, needs and desires and offer them as we have been instructed to do.

And then the moments of our own lives, the time of the clock and the eternal nature of God’s Time all touch. It is the moment when the Lord said to His Disciples take and eat…It is the moment when in His Passion He died for us and for our salvation….It is the moment when the Lord will return in Glory to judge the quick and the dead… For to God all these moments are eternally now and through our sacramental life we are allowed to reach forth our hands and be touched by the Divine Eternity.

My biological clock has still not reset from daylight saving time, and I more keenly aware each year that chronological time progresses forward. So I will struggle with you to ponder how I may enter more deeply into the celebration and anticipation of the Lord’s Nativity and His coming again. I will try to pause each day, even if it is only for a moment, to realize that the time that is moving so quickly around me is but part of God’s Creation. I will try and live for at least a moment of time each day in God’s Time.

If we can consider all these things and in humility recognize our own unworthiness, then by God’s Grace, like the Blessed Mother, we may prepare a place in our hearts for the Lord. For we know that God is faithful and that just as He has prepared a place for us, that if we prepare a place for Him our life, He will dwell with us so that we may dwell with Him forever.

The Very Rev. Canon Bartholomew G. Ryan, Rector +

Rector, The Anglican Church of Saint Dunstan 


FEELING ANGRY?

Feeling Angry?
Photo by Luke 
Come make your confession with Fr. Hines during Advent so that you can welcome Christ anew, this Christmas season.
Confession times at church:
Saturday, December 8
2:00 – 3:00 pm
Saturday, December 15
2:00 – 3:00 pm
Saturday, December 22
2:00 – 3:00 pm

THANKSGIVING DINNER AT CIMARRON HIGH SCHOOL A BIG HIT!


Contributed by Parishoner Carol Fabbri
Normally our Thanksgivings have all been the same: cook a traditional dinner; have the family over; and over-eat – and with my husband’s cooking that’s very easy. Bob and I have often talked about working at a homeless shelter or such on Thanksgiving, but have never followed through. This year that changed. When Fr. Hines asked for volunteers to help feed homeless families at Cimarron Memorial High School, we jumped at the chance. We, and others from St. George’s and many volunteers from Clark County School District, signed up for various jobs.

Chateau de Cimarron, Thanksgiving

Chateau de Cimarron, Thanksgiving

The school cafeteria was festively decorated and welcoming. The
guest families were treated to a great day. All the volunteers went out of their ways to make this dinner a very special time.

Bob and I got so much more out of our time at Cimarron High School than we gave. There was wonderful fellowship with people who were strangers when we started, but not by the time our shift was over. We all shared a common goal: to make others feel good, and that made us feel good. We were happy to share information about St. George’s with others when they asked about our church, and to invite them to our upcoming holiday events.

We left the school with a greater appreciation of the blessings that God has given us, and our own Thanksgiving dinner with our family was a more cherished event. We spent more time talking about what we are thankful for.

It was a wonderful experience, and, God willing, will become part of our Thanksgiving day for years to come.

~Carol Fabbri

Click to read the Review Journal’s coverage of the event: “Dinner with fixings at ‘Chateau de Cimarron’.

Fr. Hines, Santa and Luke bring cheer to Cimarron Thanksgiving feast

Fr. Hines, Santa and Luke bring cheer to Cimarron Thanksgiving feast


ANGLICAN YOUTH GROUP!

Sunday Dec. 9th
Immediately after
10:30 Mass

Lunch ~ Fun ~ Friends ~ Fellowship


ADVENT & CHRISTMAS HOLY DAY KALENDAR 2012

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

2

1st Sunday in Advent
800 am
10:30 am

( Violet)
3

[S. Francis
Xavier C.]
(White)

4

[St. Clement of Alexandria, C.D.]

(White)
5

5:45 pm
Evening Prayer
6:00 pm
Mass

(Violet)
6

[St. Nicholas, B.C.]

(White)
7

[St.Ambrose of Milan, B.C.]

(White)

Abstinence

8

[Conception of BVM]
(Day of Obligation)

(White)
9

2nd Sunday in Advent
800 am
10:30 am

(Violet)
10

Requiem Mass

Wally
Hawkins
11:30 am

(Violet)

11

12

(St. Lucy, transferred)
5:45 pm
Evening Prayer
6:00 pm
Mass

(Red)
13

[St. Lucy, V.M.]
(Transfer to Wed. 12th)

(Red)
14

Abstinence

15

16

3rd Sunday in Advent
(Rose Sunday)

(Violet)

17

18

19

(St. Thomas, Ap. transferred)
Ember Day
5:45 pm
Evening Prayer
6:00 pm
Mass
Fast & Abstinence

(Red)
20

[Vigil of St. Thomas]

21

Ember Day
[St. Thomas, Ap.]
(transfer to Wed. 19th)
Fast & Abstinence

22

Ember Day
Fast & Abstinence

23

4th Sunday in Advent
5:00 pm
Festival of Nine Carols & Lessons

24

(Vigil of the Nativity of Our Lord)
11:00pm
Mass

(White)
25

(Nativity of Our Lord)
9:30 am
Mass

(White)
26

[St. Stephen, Dcn.. & Protomartyr]
5:45 pm
Evening Prayer
6:00 pm
Mass

(Red)

27

[St. John, Ap.
Ev.]

(White)
28

[Holy Innocents]
5:45 pm
Evening Prayer
6:00 pm
Mass

(Violet)

Abstinence

29

[St.Thomas of Canterbury, B.M]

(Red)
30

1st Sunday after Christmas
800 am
10:30 am

(White)
31

[St. Sylvester, B.C.

(White)
Jan. 1

The
Circumcision
Of Christ and Octave Day of the Nativity of Our Lord
5:45pm
Evening Prayer
6:00pm
Mass

(White)


CALLING ALL TEENS!
Wordpress Class Available

Webmaster Ginny Deering is in search of teens who would like to learn WordPress. Lessons will include posting Sunday School and AYG news on the church website. Photoshop lessons are also included.

If you are interested, please contact Ginny Deering. Class will be held after 10:30 Mass.

It is best to bring your own laptop, but iPads will work, also. If neither is available, never fear! You can use Ginny’s.


HOME ADVENT WREATH KITS AVAILABLE


Advent Wreath kits are now available for purchase at $14.00 If you cannot meet this price, please speak with Fr. Hines. The Advent Wreath kits will be displayed on the patio after the Sunday Masses. Please contact Kim Jones if you are interested in acquiring a kit.  Fr Hines states, “I strongly encourage you to use the Advent Devotional (copies can be found with the Advent Wreath kit display at church or in this newsletter). This is an excellent way to introduce prayer and reading the Bible with your children, family and friends at the dinner table and at other times.”The wreath celebrates the beginning of the liturgical year. It also overflows with Christian symbols. For example, the circle represents the eternal nature of God and of His love; the evergreens symbolize eternal life; the laurel, victory over suffering and death; the yew and pine, immortality. Holly has special significance: the prickly leafs signify the crown of thorns that awaits the Blessed Baby. It is also said that the Cross on which Christ would hang was made of holly. Pine cones and seed pods hold the promise of our new life in Christ.Lighting the CandlesThere is one candle for each of the four weeks of Advent. The three purple candles (and the purple ribbon) are for penance, while one rose candle is for Rose Sunday. It reminds us that we are half way through this somber season of expectancy. It also tells us to rejoice because the Lord is at hand.

Arrangements for who lights the candles will vary according to the family make-up (traditional, single-parent, etc.) and number of children. Most common is for the father to light the first candle on the first Sunday. On the second Sunday the mother lights the first and second candles; on the third Sunday the oldest child lights the first, second, and third candles; and on the fourth Sunday the youngest

child lights all four candles. Now all the candles shed their brilliance to announce the approaching nativity of our Lord.

A very practical custom is to make the evening meal each day the time for the candle lighting ceremony, allowing the candles to burn until after the meal. Or the prayers at the wreath may be used as family prayers at bedtime each evening. During the twelve days of Christmas (December 25 — January 6) the purple candles and ribbon may be replaced with white ones, and all four candles may be lit at mealtime or during family prayers. Bright Christmas balls may also be added to the wreath during the Christmas season.

Liturgy for Lighting the Candles 

A member of the family lights one or more candles of the Advent wreath, depending on the Sunday in Advent.

Leader: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord

Jesus Christ.

All:           Thanks be to God.

Leader:     Rejoice – The Lord is at hand.

All:           Come, Lord Jesus!  

Leader:     Reads Scripture passage for the day (see list below) and concludes with “Here endeth the lesson.” 

All:            Thanks be to God. 

Blessing of the Advent Wreath  

On the first Sunday in Advent the leader asks God’s blessing on the

wreath with the following words:

O Lord, by Whose Word all things are sanctified; pour forth Thy blessings upon this wreath of green, and grant that we who use

it may prepare our hearts for the coming of Christ, and may receive Thy abundant grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 

Leader: Let us pray. (Use the collect for the week. See Daily Prayer.)

All: 

Visit, O Lord, this habitation and this family; drive far from  it all snares of the enemy, let Thy holy angels dwell herein 

to preserve us in peace, and let Thy blessing be ever upon us, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Leader: The almighty and merciful Lord, Father, Son, and Holy 

Ghost, bless us and keep us. Amen.

At the end of the meal all of the candles are extinguished.  

Watch for Collects for each week of Advent in following issues.

 

SUGGESTED READINGS FOR ADVENT

Day
Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4

Sun.

Jn 1:9-14 Isa 40:1-12

Isa 9:6-7

Jn 5:37-47

Mon. Jn 3:16-21

Gen 3:1-21

Isa 7:10-16

Lk 1:5-38

Tues. Isa 60:1-3

Mic 5:1-3

Isa 11:1-6

Matt 1:18-25

Wed. Psa 43:3-5

Hos 11:3-4

Isa 40:9-11 Lk 1:39-56
Thurs. Isa 58:6-9 I

Psa 130

Isa 52:7-12 Lk 1:57-80
Fri. Jn 2:8-11

Mic 6:6-8

Jer 33:14-16

Matt 2:16-23

Sat. I Jn 3:1-2, 7-10 Jer 14:7-9 Mat 3:1-6

ADVENT WOMEN’S BIBLE STUDY CONTINUES WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 7:00 pm

Janie Brown leads Advent Class

Janie Brown leads Advent Class

Parishoner Janie Brown continues a four-week Bible study on Wednesday, December 5 at 7:00 pm.

This is a fresh look at the Advent season using an introspective approach from the point of view of the gifts of the Magi.

The class is no charge as there are no books to order. It’s not too late to join in! Contact Janie Brown and let her know you are interested.


Kirkin' 'O The Tartans

Sunday, December 2nd at 10:30 am
in Honor of St. Andrews Day 

SAVE THE DATE!

KIRKIN’ O’ THE TARTANS  

St. Andrew’s Society and St. George’s Anglican ACW will be serving a fine reception after the 10:30 am Mass.

For more information, please click here.



REMEMBER TO WEAR YOUR BADGE…

Visitors and new members will feel so much more welcome when they know your name.


Badges are always available just outside the church door. If you do not have one yet, or have lost yours, please sign up – the clipboard is just below the badges.


 

DON’T FORGET TO VOLUNTEER FOR
PROJECT HOMELESS CONNECT 

 

When:  December 6

Starts: 9:00 am

Ends: 4:00 pm

Our community needs your help!

Project Homeless Connect

December 6, 2012
Las Vegas Cashman Center

 (LV Blvd & Washington)

7:00AM – 5:00PM

 

Project Homeless Connect is a collaborative effort across the community that connects homeless families and individuals to services they need to get off the streets and into housing and jobs.  This event has served over 3,000 individuals every year for the past 21 years.

Join us this year as a volunteer!

Adult Activities Section

Faith community volunteers are needed to staff booths that provide reading material, Bibles or other interfaith religious books, prayer and a caring “ear” to listen to folks seeking assistance.

Please contact Veronica Gibson (Adult Activities Chair) to reserve your booth at

or 796-7770.

VOLUNTEERS are also needed for the 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. shift!

Click here to learn more and sign up for a volunteer shift online.

Thank you for helping this collaborative effort.

for more information about our church’s participation, please contact parishoner

Rebecca Andrews.


THE FESTIVAL OF NINE LESSONS AND CAROLS

Sunday, December 23, 2012 at 5:00 to 6:00 p.m.

Reception following

Blessing the Creche

Blessing the Creche

For the latest information, please click here.

ADVENT MESSAGE FROM THE RECTOR

Fr. Gordon Hines

The year was 166 AD. The place was a Roman city. It was one of countless Roman cities whose citizens were suffering from their first great plague, most likely smallpox.

When a person contracted the plague, neighbors and families would often abandon them, sending them into the streets to die. And die they did, with their last refuge before their demise often being the fountain at the city’s center. There they could quench their parched throats with water. If you were to walk the streets of a Roman city during this season of death you could mark the plague victims by their blood-soaked clothes, caused by hemorrhaging pustules on the skin.

Yet, in the midst of this human misery, Christians were there to care for the sick, risking their lives by doing so. Disregarding concerns for their own welfare, they would gather up the sick and dying and carry them to the home of a fellow-Christian, who would tend to them. The sick were bathed, their wounds treated. The greatest gift the Christians imparted to those whom they cared for was their love and compassion. While there was no cure for the smallpox, Christians tending to the victims increased the disease survival rate by as much as two-thirds.

Something remarkably new was cascading into human history since the Advent of the Incarnation:  disciples of Our Blessed Lord were imitating His life by loving their neighbor through acts of sacrificial love. “For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink…. Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me” (Matthew 25:35, 40).

Slave, soldier, pauper, nobleman – all were viewed in the eyes of the Christian as children of God, made in His image and likeness. Such selflessness had never been experienced since the dawn of human history, and this led to numerous converts to the Faith.[1]

 

As in the plague infested Roman days, the cry for help among our fellowmen today is equally great. Many are increasingly finding themselves hungry, homeless, sick and bereft of family and friends. Our Lord will bless our efforts if we allow Him to work in and through us.

Loving others, however, can be daunting, and many feel they cannot rise to the challenge. When we feel unworthy or inadequate in trying to give of ourselves, we can draw strength and encouragement from this great teaching by F. Fenelon, “You will find all that is lacking in your heart in the heart of Jesus.” A corollary to this saying by Fenelon is offered by another great writer, the Anglican G. P. Carleton, who said, “The more we know him, the more we shall love him; and the more we love him, the more we shall want to serve him.”[2]    

My prayer for each of you this Advent is that you will experience God’s love in a more profound and miraculous way. Advent is a wonderful season in the Church Year to meditate on the wonderful mystery of the Incarnation – of God taking on our flesh in the womb of the Virgin Mary. Through prayer and the Sacraments we experience union and intimacy with Our Lord.  The motive behind God’s dwelling among us is love. Our Lord entered into human history to share in our sufferings, to save us from sin and death.

We already see the love of God incarnate in our members through countless acts of sacrificial giving of time, treasure and talent. Our love for one another can continue to flourish the more we allow Christ to dwell in us and we in Him. He will be Incarnate in our lives if we invite Him in through prayer, His Word and the Sacraments and through the many other opportunities being made available this Advent at St. George’s.

I encourage each of you to read Raymond Raynes work, The Faith(please see a write-up of this work below). The Advent Wreath daily devotional (see below) is fabulous for nurturing daily prayer and Bible reading as a family around the dinner table. Visiting a shut-in or feeding the hungry through our Pastoral Care Ministry network is available to you. Inviting a friend or family member to our children’s Christmas pageant and the Festival of Nine Lessons carol service is also a terrific way to share the love of Our Blessed Lord, preparing our hearts for celebrating the joys of His Nativity.

With every good wish and blessing this Advent Season,

 

Fr. Gordon Hines+


[1] Colson, Charles & Fickett, Harold, The Faith (Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 2008), pps. 15-17.

[2] Carleton, G. D., The King’s Highway, (Tufton Books, 2001), p. 7.

Thanksgiving Newsletter

WHAT WE ARE THANKFUL FOR

from Becky Heerema, Junior Sunday School ClassChance
Sunday, the Junior class studied 1 Thessalonians 5:18:

“Be thankful in all things”.

They learned to be “bright side” thankful people even through unpleasantness. Here are some of their thoughts:







FIRE SALE ON TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATIONS!

Let me first state I am not a professional trader or financial advisor and anything I state is purely from my perspective and my perspective alone. Keeping in mind, the purpose I write this to you is for the benefit of St. Georges Church, and if you gain in that benefit spiritually, financially or get a feel-good feeling, take that as an added bonus.

I’ve recently heard that any tax deductible donation to both Non-Profits and Charitable organizations is being eyed by the current administration for Tax reform. Specifically; there are current considerations to either cap tax deductible donations or limit the amount of tax deduction you can take for your Philanthropic and Religious donations or tithes!

Let’s add to the fire: if you combine that with everyone’s concerns with the “Fiscal Cliff” as well as the new proposed capital gains tax increase for your current Stock Investments, I suppose a lot of people will start to feel a bit of anxiety, or a lot of anxiety.
At this point it’s a guessing game what our legislators will do with the upcoming capital gains increase. But if you are thinking of taking your winnings now, you’ll be responsible for the 15% capital gains vs. the 20% proposed for 2013 and let’s not forget the additional 3.8% for Medicare too; I think that gets tossed on as well. (Again, I’m not a professional trader.)

Let me cite a portion of an article written on Nov 17th in USA Today. This might help put things in perspective.

“Here’s how selling shares of high-flying Pulte now could save you money if capital gains taxes rise next year. Let’s say you bought 1,000 shares on Sept. 18, 2011 for $5.47 a share. That $5,470 investment rose in value to $15,240 through Thursday’s close. If you sell now, take the $9,770 profit and pay the current 15% capital gains rate, your tax liability for the trade will be $1,465.50. If you wait until 2013 and the rate climbs to 23.8%, your tax bill would climb to $2,325.26, or nearly $860 more.”

In light of the pervious paragraph – what to do? Indeed; what to do? If you partake in the selloff of your investments in whole or in part before the new “Tax Year 2013”, please remember one name – Jesus Christ, who gave his life as a ransom for us. Please remember His workers in faith at St. George’s Anglican Church. Please remember St. George’s needs your financial help or your time or your talent. Be prayerful in your remembrance. To paraphrase a portion from 2nd Corinthians 9 “let each one give as he purposes in his heart, not grudgingly or of necessity; for God loves a cheerful giver.”

Respectfully,
Vincent Mills
Jr. Warden


ADVENT WOMEN’S BIBLE STUDY TO BEGIN WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28TH


A four-week Bible study will be led by Parishoner Janie Brown beginning Wed., Nov. 28th at 7:00 pm. The class is no charge as there are no books to order.

A clipboard is located at the back of the church or on the patio, if you are interested.


THE ADVENT WREATH


Liturgy for Lighting the Candles

A member of the family lights one or more candles of the Adventwreath, depending on the Sunday in Advent.

Leader: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.

All: Thanks be to God.

Leader: Rejoice – The Lord is at hand.

All: Come, Lord Jesus!

Leader: Reads Scripture passage for the day (see list) and concludes with “Here endeth the lesson.”

All: Thanks be to God.

Blessing of the Advent Wreath

On the first Sunday in Advent the leader asks God’s blessing on the
wreath with the following words:

O Lord, by Whose Word all things are sanctified; pour forth Thy blessings upon this wreath of green, and grant that we who use
it may prepare our hearts for the coming of Christ, and may receive Thy abundant grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Leader: Let us pray. (Use the collect for the week. See Daily Prayer.)

All: Visit, O Lord, this habitation and this family; drive far from it all snares of the enemy, let Thy holy angels dwell herein to preserve us in peace, and let Thy blessing be ever upon us, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Leader: The almighty and merciful Lord, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, bless us and keep us. Amen.

At the end of the meal all of the candles are extinguished.

Watch for Collects for each week of Advent in following issues. Check daily readings for the Second Week Before Advent.


ADVENT CALENDAR

The Advent Calendar pictured here is a wonderful devotional to use during the season of Advent. These calendars are available at the church.

…and they are free!


CHECK OUT OUR FACEBOOK PAGE!

Our Facebook page is a great place to catch up on what we’re doing every day. We post great photos taken by our kids, photos of the most recent events and, of course a very handy daily post of the Daily Office. And don’t forget to “LIKE” us!



Sunday, December 2nd at 10:30 am
in Honor of St. Andrews Day

SAVE THE DATE!

KIRKIN’ O’ THE TARTANS

Due to some dancers’ travel plans and conflicts in schedule, they will not be able to perform for us on December 2, but will look forward to performing for us for the Feast of St. George in April, 2013.

For more information, please click here.


THE FESTIVAL OF NINE LESSONS AND CAROLS

Sunday, December 23, 2012 at 5:00 to 6:00 p.m.
Reception following


Newsletter – Twenty-third Sunday in Trinity

ADVENT MESSAGE FROM THE RECTOR 

Fr. Gordon Hines

The year was 166 AD. The place was a Roman city. It was one of countless Roman cities whose citizens were suffering from their first great plague, most likely smallpox.  

 

When a person contracted the plague, neighbors and families would often abandon them, sending them into the streets to die. And die they did, with their last refuge before their demise often being the fountain at the city’s center. There they could quench their parched throats with water. If you were to walk the streets of a Roman city during this season of death you could mark the plague victims by their blood-soaked clothes, caused by hemorrhaging pustules on the skin.  

 

Yet, in the midst of this human misery, Christians were there to care for the sick, risking their lives by doing so. Disregarding concerns for their own welfare, they would gather up the sick and dying and carry them to the home of a fellow-Christian, who would tend to them. The sick were bathed, their wounds treated. The greatest gift the Christians imparted to those whom they cared for was their love and compassion. While there was no cure for the smallpox, Christians tending to the victims increased the disease survival rate by as much as two-thirds.  

 

Something remarkably new was cascading into human history since the Advent of the Incarnation:  disciples of Our Blessed Lord were imitating His life by loving their neighbor through acts of sacrificial love. “For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink…. Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me” (Matthew 25:35, 40).  

 

Slave, soldier, pauper, nobleman – all were viewed in the eyes of the Christian as children of God, made in His image and likeness. Such selflessness had never been experienced since the dawn of human history, and this led to numerous converts to the Faith.[1]

 

As in the plague infested Roman days, the cry for help among our fellowmen today is equally great. Many are increasingly finding themselves hungry, homeless, sick and bereft of family and friends. Our Lord will bless our efforts if we allow Him to work in and through us.     

 

Loving others, however, can be daunting, and many feel they cannot rise to the challenge. When we feel unworthy or inadequate in trying to give of ourselves, we can draw strength and encouragement from this great teaching by F. Fenelon, “You will find all that is lacking in your heart in the heart of Jesus.” A corollary to this saying by Fenelon is offered by another great writer, the Anglican G. P. Carleton, who said, “The more we know him, the more we shall love him; and the more we love him, the more we shall want to serve him.”[2]    

 

My prayer for each of you this Advent is that you will experience God’s love in a more profound and miraculous way. Advent is a wonderful season in the Church Year to meditate on the wonderful mystery of the Incarnation – of God taking on our flesh in the womb of the Virgin Mary. Through prayer and the Sacraments we experience union and intimacy with Our Lord.  The motive behind God’s dwelling among us is love. Our Lord entered into human history to share in our sufferings, to save us from sin and death.

 

We already see the love of God incarnate in our members through countless acts of sacrificial giving of time, treasure and talent. Our love for one another can continue to flourish the more we allow Christ to dwell in us and we in Him. He will be Incarnate in our lives if we invite Him in through prayer, His Word and the Sacraments and through the many other opportunities being made available this Advent at St. George’s.   

 

I encourage each of you to read Raymond Raynes work, The Faith (please see a write-up of this work below). The Advent Wreath daily devotional (see below) is fabulous for nurturing daily prayer and Bible reading as a family around the dinner table. Visiting a shut-in or feeding the hungry through our Pastoral Care Ministry network is available to you. Inviting a friend or family member to our children’s Christmas pageant and the Festival of Nine Lessons carol service is also a terrific way to share the love of Our Blessed Lord, preparing our hearts for celebrating the joys of His Nativity.

 

With every good wish and blessing this Advent Season,

 

Fr. Gordon Hines+

 


[1] Colson, Charles & Fickett, Harold, The Faith (Zondervan, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 2008), pps. 15-17.

[2] Carleton, G. D., The King’s Highway, (Tufton Books, 2001), p. 7.


 

THE ADVENT WREATH

 

Advent Wreath

 

  

Its Tradition and Symbolism 

 

 
The origins of the Advent wreath are obscure. Historians agree that it originated in Europe and probably pre-dates the birth of the baby Jesus. Pagans brought the tradition with them when they were bap- tized. The word “advent” itself derives from the Latin adventus, which means “coming.” In this context, of course, it refers to our penitent yet joyous preparation for the coming our Blessed Lord, for the season of Christmas.  most interest.

 

The wreath celebrates the beginning of the liturgical year. It also overflows with Christian symbols. For example, the circle represents the eternal nature of God and of His love; the evergreens symbolize eternal life; the laurel, victory over suffering and death; the yew and pine, immortality. Holly has special significance: the prickly leafs signify the crown of thorns that awaits the Blessed Baby. It is also said that the Cross on which Christ would hang was made of holly. Pine cones and seed pods hold the promise of our new life in Christ. 

  

Lighting the Candles 

There is one candle for each of the four weeks of Advent. The three purple candles (and the purple ribbon) are for penance, while one rose candle is for Rose Sunday. It reminds us that we are half way through this somber season of expectancy. It also tells us to rejoice because the Lord is at hand. 

  

Arrangements for who lights the candles will vary according to the family make-up (traditional, single-parent, etc.) and number of children. Most common is for the father to light the first candle on the first Sunday. On the second Sunday the mother lights the first and second candles; on the third Sunday the oldest child lights the first, second, and third candles; and on the fourth Sunday the youngest 

child lights all four candles. Now all the candles shed their brilliance to announce the approaching nativity of our Lord.

  

A very practical custom is to make the evening meal each day the time for the candle lighting ceremony, allowing the candles to burn until after the meal. Or the prayers at the wreath may be used as family prayers at bedtime each evening. During the twelve days of Christmas (December 25 — January 6) the purple candles and ribbon may be re- placed with white ones, and all four candles may be lit at mealtime or during family prayers. Bright Christmas balls may also be added to the wreath during the Christmas season. 

  

Supplies for making an Advent Wreath are available at Marshalls or Joanne’s stores. If you have difficulty in finding these materials, please inform Fr. Hines.  

Liturgy for Lighting the Candles 

 

A member of the family lights one or more candles of the Advent wreath, depending on the Sunday in Advent.

  

Leader: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord

Jesus Christ.

All:Thanks be to God.

Leader:Rejoice – The Lord is at hand.

All: Come, Lord Jesus!  

Leader:     Reads Scripture passage for the day (see list) and concludes with “Here endeth the lesson.” 

All:Thanks be to God. 

Blessing of the Advent Wreath    

On the first Sunday in Advent the leader asks God’s blessing on the

wreath with the following words:

O Lord, by Whose Word all things are sanctified; pour forth Thy blessings upon this wreath of green, and grant that we who use

it may prepare our hearts for the coming of Christ, and may receive Thy abundant grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 

Leader:     Let us pray. (Use the collect for the week.)

Click to enlarge

 

The Advent Calendar pictured here is a wonderful devotional to use during the season of Advent.  These calendars are available at the church.
…and they’re free!

 

ADVENT WOMEN’S BIBLE STUDY TO BEGIN WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28TH

 

A four-week Bible study will be led by Parishoner Janie Brown beginning Wed., Nov. 28th at 7:00 pm. The class is no charge as there are no books to order. A clipboard is located at the back of the church or on the patio, if you are interested.


PRESS RELEASE  from
THE MOST REVEREND ROBERT SHERWOOD MORSE 
 

Dear Clergy of the Anglican Province of Christ the King,

The American Church Union is pleased to announce a new publication, The Faith, by Raymond Raynes, former Superior of the Community of the Resurrection in Mirfield, England.

Father Raynes gave these addresses at a retreat in Denver, Colorado in October of 1957. His words today speak to us with renewed power and sanctity. Nicholas Mosley edited the first printing of these addresses, published by Faith Press, London, in 1961. We are honored to produce this Second Edition, with the gracious permission of the Community of the Resurrection and with a new Foreward by Nicholas Mosley, Lord Ravensdale.

I’m attaching a press release with further details and heartily recommend this slim volume for parish study and inspiration, for Confirmation preparation, and for spiritual retreats. We are offering a special introductory price of $5.00, including shipping and handling.

With every good wish and blessing,

The Most Reverend Robert Sherwood Morse
 
Chairman
The American Church Union

St. Joseph of Arimathea Theological College

 

 

NEW RELEASEThe Faith

 

The American Church Union’s

Second Edition of

 

THE FAITH

Instructions on the Christian Faith by

 

RAYMOND RAYNES C.R.

 

Edited by Nicholas Mosley and Christine Sunderland

With kind permission of the

Community of the Resurrection

 

 

THESE TALKS were taken down as spoken by Father Raymond Raynes, C.R. during a fortnight’s mission at the church of St. Michael and All Angels, Denver, Colorado, U.S.A., in October 1957. Father Raynes had been Superior of the Community of the Resurrection at Mirfield for fifteen years: he was to die a few months later. These talks are a distillation and a climax of his teaching.

             “The missions that Father Raynes took during his last years had an extraordinary effect upon his hearers. He was ill, and his appearance was gaunt and startling. He spoke with no rhetoric, but with an intensity that kept people transfixed night after night who had come at first only from convention. His message was dogmatic and sometimes stern (also funny): but he exhilarated all those who heard him. They knew that he spoke from the heart of his own experience; and that he cared passionately to convey his faith to others.

             “All his life he was ‘as one having authority.’ “

 

Nicholas Mosley, author of The Life of Raymond Raynes, 1961

 

85 pages, Paperback, Perfect Bound,

Special Introductory Price, $5.00 incl. shipping and handling  

 

Note to St. George’s parishioners: Copies are available for purchase in our parish bookstore. Price: $5.00

 

Or you may order from:American Church Union

The American Church Union, P.O. Box 40020, Berkeley, California 94704

www.AnglicanPCK.org, 510-841-3083

 


BAKE SALE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18!
Great goodies for sale!

Drop off your baked goods for the Bake Sale on Saturday, November 17 between 2:00 and 4:00 pm. ACW volunteers will be there to receive,  organize and price all donated baked goods and crafts.

 

All items will be available for sale after 8:00 and 10:30 am Mass.


COFFEE HOUR VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Coffee Hour Hostess Donna Foust
Thank you,
Donna and Dale Foust!

 

We give thanks to Donna and Dale Foust, who have faithfully prepared the 8:00 a.m. coffee hour for many, many years. They could use your help.

 

The hour of fellowship after Mass is a treasured and enjoyable time and is a responsibility that should be shared.  On the rare occasions the Fousts were not able to attend Mass, we have sometimes had to forego Coffee Hour.

 

Our thanks go out, also, to the Starchers, who graciously filled in in the Fousts’ absence, recently.

 

We express gratitude to all our Coffee Hour volunteers. Please consider adding your name to the volunteer schedule this Sunday.

Kirkin of the Tartan

Sunday, December 2nd at 10:30 am
in Honor of St. Andrews Day 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

KIRKIN’ O’ THE TARTANS  

Due to some dancers’ travel plans and conflicts in schedule, they will not be able to perform for us on December 2,  but will look forward to performing for us for the Feast of St. George in April, 2013.

For more information, please click here.


 

THE FESTIVAL OF NINE LESSONS AND CAROLS

 

Sunday, December 23, 2012 at 5:00 to 6:00 p.m.

Reception following


Hurricane Sandy Relief

 

Donations are still being accepted. Gifts may be sent to St. George’s Anglican Church or placed in the offering plate during Sunday or weekday Mass. Please note on your check or envelope that these funds are for Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief.
This is a Diocesan effort. If you feel moved to give, please note that that donations from St. George’s Anglican Church will be sent to the Diocesan office. Bishop Morrison will designate a relief organization to be the recipient of these gifts.
Plan to attend…   
 
THANKSGIVING
DAY MASS

Thursday, November 22
9:30 a.m.

 

REQUIEM FOR
WALLY HAWKINS

 

December 10, 2012
11:30 am

 

Wally Hawkins’ requiem will be held on Monday, December 10, 2012 at 11:30 am at St. George’s Church.

A graveside service will follow at 2:00 pm at Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Boulder City.

Scott and Katie Kruse invite everyone to both services and to a reception at their home after the burial service. Their address is 9856 Masked Duck, Las Vegas, NV  89117.


Let's Hang Out!

Anglican Youth Group meets Sunday, December 9, immediately after the 10:30 am Mass.

They will enjoy lunch together then an hour of fellowship.


UPDATE
PROJECT HOMELESS CONNECT IS IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS
Project Homeless Connect

When:  December 6

Starts: 9:00 am

Ends: 4:00 pm

Volunteers are needed for the 9:00am to 4:00pm time period, but volunteers are requested to arrive between 7:00 – 7:30 am.

Volunteers are requested to report between 7:00 and 7:30 am.and will be provided a Project Homeless T-Shirt.

If you would like to volunteer, please forward your email address to
Rebecca Andrews.


UPDATE ON
THANKSGIVING DINNER VOLUNTEER SCHEDULE FOR CIMARRON HIGH SCHOOL
 

Thursday, November 22

 

Thanksgiving Teens
Thanksgiving for Teens

Give thanks for our blessings!

VOLUNTEER SCHEDULE

7:00 am – 10:00 am

10:00 am 1:00 pm

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

4:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Dinner for approximately 1000 homeless students and their families will be served from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm.

The greatest need is for the 4:00 – 7:00 pm time slot.
There will be a signup sheet available this Sunday.
Please provide your name, phone number and email address so we can contact you to confirm your volunteer time
TRAVEL TO ENGLAND
Pilgrammage to England

 

WHO? Curious, Kindly, Fun-loving, Bucket-List Travel Seekers *WHAT? A 6-9 nights trip to London, Canterbury, Stratford-Upon-Avon Oxford or Cambridge
WHEN? April 2013 WHY? What are you waiting for? Experience history, castles, churches, gardens, shopping, museums, art, music, fellowship, food & literature!
How Much? $1,350.00 (reflects March, 2013 travel prices) pp/dbl including 6 nts 3star hotel; breakfast; airfare from Las Vegas. Optional: other meals, sightseeing bus ($48.pp), tours except as led by Hosts, train/bus

 

Fares: To destinations outside London ($10-$40pp), tube pass incl Thames cruise & ($28pp).
*What are you waiting for? Do not count anyone out based on age or abilities. We will travel in 3 small teams based on speed, ability & interests. All are welcome.
** The airfare may be extended so anyone desiring to add additional options may do so… like a cruise; overnight ferry to Belgium, train or air to Scotlnd/Ireland/Wales, Chunnel to France, narrowboat to the Cotswolds, or a European cruise (from $299/pp/dbl)etc.
Faith & Fellowship Travels is a division of Travel with Al and Kathy, a Nevada LLC

 

or call 702-472-6460

THE 14TH ANNUAL SYNOD & ACW CONFERENCE OF THE DIOCESE OF THE SOUTHWESTERN STATES

Article by St. George’s parishioner Kathleen G. Hoffman, St. Anne’s ACW Secretary

Day 1: The Hotel & Accommodations

The hotel is set in a business park, with a round courtyard and many facilities including hot tub, pool, sauna, and exercise room. It has a very large inside courtyard with multi-level open galleried interior decorated with artwork, greens and ivy and a running brook open to a glass ceiling.  Several restaurants and a wi-fi center are part of the facilities.

After settling into our hotel rooms, the host parish of the Synod, All Saints, invited us to a fabulous reception, which included cocktails and a buffet of roast beef, sauces and rolls, marinated and grilled vegetables and more. The relaxed and inviting ambiance made for an enjoyable time of becoming better acquainted with the other attendees at the Synod.

Transportation to and from the airport was provided by the hotel. We received from Synod Coordinator, Linda Unruh, our name badges and treat bags full of goodies, pens, paper, water, info on Tulsa, and several gifts, with a welcome note attached to the bag.

The Cheerleaders! The hotel was filled with hundreds of sweet and noisy young teens practicing their music and programs! They told us all about their programs and the competition. Many were from the Christian churches in the area. They were very proud of their multi-national strong friendships.

Everyone was very friendly and welcoming. Even our ministers, postulants, and Bishop’s staff members were interesting and from so many different backgrounds. Linda Unruh and Lynda Volpe, DSWS ACW President, introduced themselves right away! It was a very enjoyable and relaxing way to spend our first evening. So many new faces to meet and get to know!

The seminars/programs and schedules were very well defined in our booklets, plus many reports, budgets, and information.

DAY 2: The Synod Begins: An Excellent Series of Programs

The General Business Meeting

The Bishop was very prayerful, efficient, and succinct. The meeting included the introduction of the three postulants; the explanation of the office and election of Fr. Frank Brulc, Dean of All Saints Cathedral in Tulsa, as the Bishop Suffragan*, among other elections and nominations. It was a privilege to be called by name to vote as a lay delegate for St. George’s. The Bishop’s Address stressed the needs of our Diocese for priests and explained the importance of a proper calling. He counseled patience and prayer. He thanked and acknowledged the many planners and work done for the Synod. He noted that “Angels can fly because they take themselves lightly,” quoted from a book he had read. He was a witty and impressive speaker. Some items mentioned were:

 

-Prayers for improved health for Fr. Miley

-Prayers and thanksgiving for the life and ministry of Fr. Greer

-Prayers for the repose of the soul of Fr. Les Macabee

-Introduced three postulants and their wives:  Mark Williams, John LesCallett (Diocesan Stewardship Advisor), and Dr. William Haerter

-The minutes of the previous Synod, held at St. George’s in Las Vegas in 2011, were reviewed and accepted, as well as the Diocesan treasurer’s report, ACW report, Sunday school, budget, and financial statements.

The General Business Meeting was followed by an hour set aside for meditationand a very lovely Mass.

The ACW Meeting

Diocesan Synod ACW President Lynda Volpe is a very positive and exciting speaker. We were all invited to comment on our individual chapters – lots of ideas, comments, and possibilities. We discussed needs and outreach.  Lenten Mite box donations brought in almost $1000. ACW annual dues were discussed.  It is possible they will be raised to $75 per year since they have not been raised in five years.  Mrs. Volpe asked that we do our annual officer elections in December prior to the Holidays, and report them as soon as possible so that the information may be used in our publications for next year.

We discussed The Diocesan Observer newsletter and everyone was invited to submit newsworthy articles to the Bishop’s secretary, Janis Griffin, at the Diocesan office email or to Lynda Volpe at LyndaGV@cox.net.  We also discussed Project Outreach goals and donations. Youth Services, a homeless teen outreach, was our 2012 recipient and was featured on the TV news the next morning! The printed booklet for ACW is excellent and has several very good prayers for our meetings, plus a closing poem by our very own Patty Earhart! Very impressive meeting! Very good fellowship! I felt lucky to be included, just as I feel in our St. George’s ACW fellowship.

There was a colorful table display of the Prayer Shawls and their purposes. These were introduced by Rene LesCallett last year, and All Saints ACW has created over five hundred of these shawls. They are knit or crocheted, and those who do not have these skills (several have learned) have donated funds and materials to assist ($400 to date). The shawls are a powerful sign of support for those in need, and tangible signs of our caring. I was very impressed and have already started a prayer shawl. I brought back instructions, and one of the shawls was given to us to present to a fellow parishioner, Rae Waite, who has had some poor health. St. George’s parishioner and lay delegate to the Synod, Vincent Mills, even picked one out later for his mother-in-law Mary.  (Extra booklets are available for those interested.)

The ACW Luncheon was held at The Cypress Grille in our hotel. We had lots of fun, and introductions were made in a pretty private room with absolutely scrumptious and beautifully presented food! The chef and staff even gifted us with a desert of luscious fruit sorbets. It was great to get to know each other in a little more depth.

The Sunday School Seminar by Diocesan Sunday School Director Kathleen Brulc was next, and we discussed the importance of Christian education, the problems of our children today and the building of lifelong friendships among our children.  St. George’s was highly complimented for our Sunday school programs, and gifts for Kim Jones and Julie Viacava were presented to me to bring to them.  Some of the other churches have few or no children of Sunday school age, and it is difficult for them to have consistent programs. Kathleen and Fr. Robling strongly recommended teen groups in our churches. We played a game which Kathleen had learned, and I brought the cards and instructions home with me. It was a great opportunity to share each others’ thoughts, concerns, and prayers.

Fundraising & Stewardship was led by John LesCallett, our Diocesan Stewardship Advisor. He had presented a very thorough booklet last Synod, and I have brought home several copies for our use at St. George’s. In addition, he brought a new publication which assists in identifying (but not typecasting) stewardship and givers in our parishes. Both Vincent Mills and I had an opportunity to brainstorm with John for ideas and planning. John has a great sense of humor and is very knowledgeable. He has offered to visit and work with us at St. George’s upon request. I brought extra booklets for those interested.

Gala banquet This was held in one of the grand meeting rooms of the hotel and was very elegant. Fr. Hines and I sat at a large table with very stimulating conversation. Father Hines, Vincent Mills and I enjoyed the day and evening.

Day 3: The Cathedral and Mass

We requested pictures from the formal photographer but nothing can do justice to the jewel-like setting of All Saints Cathedral, which is a lovely stone cathedral with surrounding grounds. The interior of the cathedral is elegant and very English. The walls around the altar are painted a dove grey and hung with a gorgeous sculptured image of Christ on the Cross. There were brass chandeliers, incense, and a beautifully orchestrated Mass with all of the rich tapestry of a high Mass, a lovely choir (from the choir loft) and music… a very powerful Holy Eucharist. The organist finished with Aaron Copeland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man.”

The ACW Brunch The Cathedral Hall was beautifully decorated like an English garden with containers of flowers, ivy and plants in small and large arrangements. The tables were covered with matching tablecloths and cloth napkins and loaded with large chafing dishes and pitchers and cruets for juices. Jennifer, the Bishop’s wife, made a variety of scones. The room held a buffet table in the center, with four large round tables on each side.  Framed menus on the tables were a nice touch. It was obvious that the ACW and worked very hard to make such a beautiful and gracious brunch. The buffet included fresh fruits and yogurt, herb and vegetable frittatas, breads, ham, deviled eggs, croissants and so much more all beautifully presented and delicious!

The ACW ladies mentioned several times the wonderful brunch we put on at St. George’s last year also.

Special remembrances were sent to Jayme Rogers, Patty Earhart, Kim Jones, and Greetings to John Pelham, Jr. from Kathleen Brulc.

Thank you all for sending us to this outstanding event. May God Bless you!

 

*The Bishop described the office of Bishop Suffragan, the history, and that this office has existed since 1535.

St. George’s Festival, April 29th, 2012

Article by Parishoner Edward Ward

Play
Prev
Next

 
Sunday, April 29th dawned clear and bright with sunshine. The Rector and Vestry had changed the date of our Patronal St. George’s Festival to coincide with the biannual visitation of our Bishop, The Rt. Rev. Frederick G. Morrison.

Sadly, our celebration was overshadowed by the death, earlier in the week, of Father Yates Greer, our Assistant Rector. Father Greer was a faithful priest and a loving, caring pastor. His wife Judith was with him in Simi Valley, California. Judith called the Rector with the sad news, but as the plans has been made she wanted the Service and Reception to go on, as planned.

The Bishop banged on the church door with his crosier, thee times, the door was opened and the Rector, kneeling welcomed His Grace, followed by the Sr. Warden Dale Foust and the Jr. Warden Vincent Mills. A new church bell had been installed inside the church, the Bishop paused and blessed the new bell.
The bell has been given in loving memory of Canon Lesley Wilder. Father Wilder was one of the first supporters of the Province and was a good friend of Archbishop Morse. They met when Father Wilder was the Rector of St. Matthew’s Church, San Mateo and the Archbishop was the Rector of St, Paul’s in Burlingame, also in San Mateo County. This was before the Archbishop was transferred to St. Peter’s in Oakland, which is now our Pro Cathedral.

In procession the Choir and people sang “Who are these like stars appearing.” The Church was full with standing room only and several people had to stand out on the Patio. The Bishop was the celebrant at the Sung Mass, assisted by the Rector, Father Gordon Hines. The Bishop confirmed seven member of the Parish, Timothy D. Douglas, Michael David Jones, Andrew W. Kruse, Adrian DeWane Murphy, Kenneth Eugene Princen, Katrina Tondo Waddell, James Franklin Wood. The Bishop was alos pleased to bless Austin Heerema and welcomed into the Brother of St. Stephen Acolytes.

The Bishop them blessed the Icon of “St. George slaying the Dragon”, this is a reproduction of a Russian late 16th, century icon, creatred and donated to the Church by a local artist. This has now been hung in the Church as a shrine to St. George, our Patron Saint.

We sang the Offertory Hymn “Jerusalem” by Parry, this was to honor the Bishop who had come to our diocese from the English Church. He said afterwards this brought back many memories of when he was growing up in England in the diocese of Chichester, it was an emotional moment for him.
The Bishop preached on the love and the blessing of the Holy Ghost that we all receive at our confirmation.

At the Holy Communion the Sunday School children were led into the church by their Director, Kim Jones, and the teachers and the Bishop gave all 17 children his Episcopal Blessings. These young members are the future of St. George’s Parish and now we all hope in time to build our own school for them. We are now in consultation with one of the Casino Foundations we are seeking a partner for this project.
The Vestry had arranged for the Church patio to be tented for the day and it proved to be a good decision as it was rather a hot, windy day. The Church looked very festive and the Altar was adorned with the red roses of England.

Following the Sung Mass we all enjoyed a wonderful buffet lunch that had been prepared by the ladies of our Parish A.C.W.
• The President, Jayme Rogers, had carefully prepared and oversaw the event.
• Roast Tenderloin of Beef with horseradish cream
• Platters of Shrimp with cocktail sauce
• Chilled Gazpacho soup served with crusty rolls and butter
• A big selection of some 18 different salads
• Platters of fresh vegetables and dips
• A wine bar, also juces, sodas, tea and coffee
• Followed by a wonderful big Confirmation Cake and ice cream

The Bishop commented that “I see we do not need the five fishes and two loaves today.” He also asked what was done with the leftovers, some goes for the church staff lunches and the rest to the Salvation Army. The Bishop smiled, “the homeless people in Las Vegas do at least eat well.”
At the end of the reception the Rector presented the Bishop with a copy of the official Portrait of Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Philip, which was given in celebration of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The Bishop was delighted with the gift and mentioned that in England all bishops and deans have a picture of the Queen in their office. The portrait, therefore, will hang in the Bishop’s office in Tulsa.

In Leaving, the Bishop blessed us all, thanked us for a memorable day and particularly thanked the Choir Director, Mr. Thom Greathouse, and the choir for the superb job they did with the Sung Mass and Hymns.

Our church has been blessed with some beautiful memorial gifts recently and on Sunday June 3rd these had all been installed and have enhanced the beauty of the church. On Sunday June 3rd the flowars on the altar were given in thanksgiving for the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth, and we sang “Glorious things of Thee are spoken, one of her favorite hymns.

St. George’s Anglican Church Newsletter for Trinity 2012

RECTOR’S MESSAGE

Rector's Message-Cluny

In 910 A.D., a new monastic order was born at Cluny in France which would have a profound influence on European society and culture. The Order of Cluny could boast over 1,200 monasteries by the beginning of the twelfth century. This order came at a time when Europe was still in the grip of the Dark Ages, when society had unraveled with the fall of the Roman Empire. Political and social chaos and widespread poverty prevailed.

Monasticism took root under St. Benedict beginning in the 4th century but it could not weather the social tsunami that would ensue with the crumbling of the Roman government.

Cluny renewed the vigor of monasticism and in turn it led to the flowering of Western Civilization.

At the heart of the Cluny reforms was the restoration of the Rule of St. Benedict with some important adaptations; chief among them was the belief in the central role of the Mass in Christian life. The monks at Cluny felt very strongly that it was the Mass which allowed human participation in the worship in Heaven. It was inevitable that the monks’ immersion in the Divine Liturgy would enkindle in them a desire to enhance “the eternal transfixed in time” through sacred music, architecture, art, and service to fellow believers.

A renaissance of the Christian faith always occurs when there is a sincere dedication to prayer and the celebration of the Holy Eucharist, for these allow us communion with the Transcendent. We share in the interpersonal love of the Holy Trinity and in turn our hearts can burn with the love of God. We in turn yearn to give of ourselves to God and our fellow man – hence, community is born.

The Order of Cluny and monastic orders similar to it, such as the Franciscans, transformed the hearts and minds of the people of the Middle Ages. A new, Christian way of looking at God’s creation caused people to value the sanctity of human life from conception to death. This insight led to the proliferation of hospitals, orphanages, and monastic communities dedicated to tending to the poorest and most downtrodden of society.

The late Archbishop of Paris, Cardinal Jean-Marie Lustiger, once remarked, “The West is born of Christianity and the crisis of the West is that it is no longer Christian.” People are despairing because the secular world’s supposed cures to life’s problems are not working. The Church has the opportunity to renew society as those faithful Christian men and women did some 1,000 years ago.

To be the salt that preserves and enlivens our own society requires Our Lord dwelling in us, and we in Him. We can burn with the love of God, just as the monks of Cluny did, through regular participation in the Mass, in prayer, and in studying God’s Word. Our Lord can then entrust us with the work He would have us do. I believe Almighty God is hearing our heartfelt prayers and is making known to us how we can further His Kingdom both in our lives and in the lives of others. You will be hearing more about how you can give of your time, treasure, and talent in subsequent issues of The Parish Visitor. These are exciting times to be a Catholic Christian! Thanks be to God!

Sincerely in Christ,
Fr. Hines+


IN MEMORIAM

Father Yates C. Greer

Father Yates C. Greer

The Reverend Yates Calvert Greer+ died on 25 April 2012 of a stroke. Father Greer was a faithful priest and a loving, caring pastor.

Click for more

David Lee Snyder, passed away June 11, 2012. David is survived by his loving mother, Jo Stasiak of Las Vegas; his uncle, Rick, and aunt, Connie Cummings, of St. George’s Anglican Church.

Henry Joseph Graves
passed away June 23, 2012. Betty and family express thanks to the church family for their love and support. Hank loved his church. It was the joy of his life to go to church, join in prayer, and be embraced by the church family.

Bernardo Conda
Father of Fely Covert, passed away May 19, 2012. Fely and Tom, Fely’s mother, sister Marissa from Winnipeg, and Annabelle and her husband Brian were all at his bedside. A special heartfelt thank you to everyone for their for thoughts and prayers
He was a great husband and father, and will be greatly missed.


A NOTE OF THANKS FROM FORMER ALTAR GUILD DIRECTORESS RAE WAITE

Rae Waite receives Altar Guild Award

Dear Fr. Hines, Ladies of the Altar Guild, and all those who wrote notes of good wishes to me in the specially constructed card by Sharon Z.,
Thank you for your support and caring.
I was so completely caught by surprise and totally not ready for a presentation of any kind, that I forgot to thank you for being there with me.
Thank you, Fr. Hines, for all the kind words spoken on my behalf and for your patient guidance during those early years with the Altar Guild. Ladies, believe me, you never stop learning as there’s so much detail to commit to memory.
And most importantly, thank you for the very beautiful plaque presented to me by Fr. Hines——-so very beautifully put together and pulled together with God’s words.
I love you all and miss seeing you often. Thank you for your support and may God continue to bless you richly.

Rae


PASTORAL CARE NETWORK FORMED

RebeccaParishioner Rebecca Andrews has volunteered to lead a new program to address special needs within our parish. These might be the sick, shut-in, hospitalized, elderly or other needs. Parishioners have risen to the occasion to help with pastoral care, such as visits to the sick, meal preparation, reading, phone calls, etc. All ages are encouraged to participate. If you are interested please email Fr. Hines at frhines@stgeorgeanglican.org

BAPTISM JULY 1, 2012

Baptism - July 1, 2012

Baby Chikamso Simeon with Fr. Hines, parents Godwyn and Jane


ST. GEORGE’S NEW WEBSITE

Article by parishioner Ginny Deering, St. George’s webmaster

Webmaster

Our new Website has been a long time in the making. Father Gordon Hines and I got together over a year ago – May 20, 2011, as a matter of fact, to discuss our goals for the site and make plans. Initially, we listed 20 or so aspirations – not all have been fulfilled to date, but they provide a good long-term plan and direction. Father Greer, Tracy Belt, Ed Jost, Vincent Mills and Kim Jones have met with us to provide input, and we’ve also received lots of great help from John Pelham, John Davis, Connie Cummings, Janie Brown and many other Parish family members.

The inspiration for our site was that of a television network: it is necessary to always have many ongoing “shows” for our audience to tune it to. That is a tall order, as it takes time, devotion and inspiration to achieve consistent success.

Father really likes the idea of a television network, and continues to provide a prodigious amount of inspired content, guidance and direction toward the success of that goal. John Pelham meets every Friday morning to add and edit our Event Gallery page, which so far has documented events since Epiphany.

In addition to fulfilling the vision of a TV network, we are also well on our way to achieving the status of an “Authority Site,” which will, in a year or so, give us great Search Engine results. Father Greer’s two books have provided unique and inspired content that will bless many, many people both now and in the future.
In addition to Father Greer’s contributions, we also include Father Hines’ homilies weekly, along with daily readings, a contribution from Father George E. Miley, of the Holy Cross Church, in Oklahoma City, OK.

We have also drawn inspiration and content from Father Stephen Scarlett of St. Matthew’s Anglican Church in Newport Beach, California – especially the “Teaching the Faith” content.

We are currently blessed to have the following Website Editors: John Pelham, photography, Lynn Davis, Food Page (ACW section), and Connie Cummings, Saints. Edward Ward and Kathy are contributing news writers. Please contact Ginny at ginny@ginnydeering.com if you feel you’d like to contribute. We have a great need for your voice!

It is an honor and privilege to serve as the parish’s webmaster, and I look forward to working with our whole parish family to inspire our own spiritual growth, as well as that of a growing number of global visitors.


SUMMER REPORT FROM THE CHOIR

Thom Greathouse, Musical DirectorThose who stayed awake to view recent British Royal events via the Internet were treated to two original religious anthems sung by male choirs at Westminster Cathedral for the royal wedding, and at St. Paul’s Cathedral for Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee. For these new sacred songs, composers set aside modernist dissonance and artifice in favor of peaceful melody and caring words: The June 5 anthem, from Proverbs 8, used a simple call to God and His response: “Lord of Wisdom, walk beside us… /“I am here, I am with you….”
At choir rehearsals, we prepare each week’s Propers and hymns for the coming Sunday’s Mass. In addition, music director Thom Greathouse is introducing us this summer to similar short, reassuring, refreshing liturgical song by contemporary composers. Some lyrics are set atop the tunes of traditional classical music; some are newly made. All center on the presence of the Creator and Redeemer in Nature.
We are still in the rehearsal stage, but you may hear one or two at Communion in the near future, before we take on the task of building the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols. We ask you to listen to the simple directness that calms the mind and encourages Faith in this tense period in history – such as
“In the bulb there is a flower; in the seed an apple tree/ In cocoons a hidden promise, butterflies will be free…./There’s a song in every silence, bringing hope to you and me.”
We also ask anyone who loves to pray vocally to join us at our Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. rehearsals at the church. Have a lovely summer; Thom is creating one for us.
Your Choir


THE 14TH ANNUAL DIOCESAN SYNOD & ACW CONFERENCE

Article by Kathleen G. Hoffman, St. George’s parishioner and lay Synod delegate
Kathy Hoffman
I was greatly honored to attend this conference, and it gave me an opportunity for a much greater overall view of the Anglican Church in the U.S. I have attended many, many business and educational conferences, and this one was absolutely first class!
The content and scheduling times of the different programs were excellent, as was the printed material. It might be nice to hand out a thought-provoking survey after each program to allow for some brainstorming to produce additional ideas and questions while the inspiration is hot! I enjoyed the game played in the Sunday school meeting simply because we were all privy to each other’s thoughts and ideas during the game.

I learned how important it is to put my faith FIRST in decisions and ideas. Watching and listening to the clergy and others approach decisions and problem solving was also a good lesson. An added benefit was watching our priest in a community of his peers and in a different setting…allowed us to understand more of the many facets of his work.

The hotel and facilities were excellent! The masses were very beautiful, and the visit to the diocesan cathedral was magnificent. I enjoyed meeting with the ACW ladies tremendously.

I thank God for this blessed opportunity, and all those who made it possible. Thank you.
Please click this link for my detailed report on the Diocesan Synod.

-Kathleen G. Hoffman


PARISH FAMILY PATRONAL FESTIVAL OF ST GEORGE

Article by parishioner Edward Ward

Edward Ward
Sunday, April 29th, dawned clear and bright with sunshine. The Rector and Vestry had changed the date of our Patronal Festival to coincide with the biannual visitation of our Bishop, The Rt. Rev. Frederick G. Morrison.
Read more…

ALTAR RAIL

Altar RailOur beautiful new altar rail has been given by John Davis and his sister, Sister Ann Margaret, in loving memory of their parents and to their dear friend, Sister Mary Luke. Sister Mary Luke was known for her love of children, particularly the less fortunate. She worked tirelessly to bring them to Christ and to meet their most basic needs. John and Sister Ann expressed a desire for something beautiful for St. George’s in Sister Mary Luke’s memory. The engravings on the altar rail read: “We thank thee, O Lord, for all those who minister to God’s children…” (Epistle side); “Given to the greater Glory of Almighty God and in thanksgiving for families…” (Gospel side).
Fr. Greer was very interested in the commissioning of the new altar rail and he offered an explanation of its significance in his commentary on the Mass. To read Fr. Greer’s excerpt and the lovely write-up on Sister Mary Luke please click here.

From The Liturgy of Holy Communion from The Book of Common Prayer with Commentary, by Fr. Yates Greer, p. 81.

“The Altar Rail: In the 1960s liturgical churches tore out altar rails with a fervor reminiscent of 16th century Puritan zeal in beheading church statuary. Today, many architects, clergy, and parishioners find the altar rail enhances reverence on the part of communicants; indeed, many churches that were built without rails are now installing them. The future direction of the Church of Rome may be discernible from the fact that Benedict XVI requires that all those who receive the Blessed Sacrament from him do so on their knees. Can altar rails be far behind?
“Symbolism associated with the Altar Rail: Many symbols are embedded in the rail that separates the sanctuary from the nave. Here is one which many of us heard first as children: it portrays the nave as the world and the sanctuary as heaven. We live in the world (nave) while we seek to enter heaven (sanctuary). The altar rail separates the two. Jesus came from heaven to earth to open for us a gate through which we may enter when we pass from this world to the next. That is why we bow when the priest passes on his way to the sanctuary. In the Holy Eucharist the priest takes the part of Jesus who, in the Mass, still reaches across that which separates us from heaven to feed our spiritual needs with his body and blood.”

ICON OF ST. GEORGE

St. George IconThe beautiful reproduction of a sixteenth century Russian icon of St. George has found its home in the church sanctuary. The icon was given anonymously by a parishioner to the greater glory of Almighty God and in memoriam of Father Yates C. Greer, a faithful priest and a loving and caring pastor. The icon was unveiled and blessed during the Bishop Morrison’s visit on St. George’s Day. Please click here to read a short biography of the life of Fr. Greer and Judith Greer’s letter expressing her gratitude for all of the love and support she has received from parishioners.


NEW VOTIVE CANDLE SHELVES

Votive ShelvesThe two votive candle shelves under the della Robbia sculpture of the Blessed Virgin with Child and the icon of St. George were given by Janie Brown in loving memory of her mother, Mary Jane Miller. Mary Jane had a unique calling for intercessory prayer. She often petitioned for the intercessions of the mother of Our Lord while praying the rosary. The Anglican Church has always encouraged intercessory prayer including petitioning for the prayers of the saints who have passed into eternity.
In the tract, Making the Sign of the Cross, by Fr. Greer, he wrote, “When we use words to pray, we are using only one form of the language capability with which God has imbued us.” Lighting of candles is itself a prayer. It has been customary since the early Church to light candles at icons of saints. As we ask for intercessory prayer from one another, the Church encourages us to ask the saints who have passed into eternity to pray for us as well.


NEW CHURCH BELL

Church Bell
Our new church bell is given in loving memory of Canon Lesley Wilder. Father Wilder was one of the first supporters of the Province and was a good friend of Archbishop Morse. As the beloved traditional priest at St. Matthews in San Mateo, Father Wilder had narrowly
been passed over for Bishop of California in the early 1960s, and he had been named canon of Grace Cathedral. In retirement, he had continued to offer prayers and counseling from his house in San Francisco until his death in 1990.In 1994, Mrs. Crichton’s son, the author Barnaby Conrad III, approached his godfather, Bishop Morse, with an interesting proposal. Mr.
Conrad was then chairman of the board of trustees of the Fathers Wilder & Easton Foundation, a charitable trust created by The Reverend Lesley Wilder and his long-time associate, The Reverend John Easton. Bishop Morse was chairman of the St. Joseph of Arimathea Foundation, which served U.C. Berkeley students by offering prayer and counseling. Bishop Morse had been a good friend of the late fathers, and all three priests had been close to the Cowgill Crichton-Conrad clan. Father Wilder had blessed Dale Crichton’s marriage in 1949, and Bishop Morse presided at Mrs. Crichton’s funeral.

PRINCE OF PEACE PORTRAIT

Prince of Peace by Thomas Kinkade

Prince of Peace by Thomas Kinkade

The portrait of Jesus is a signed and numbered lithograph, created in 1999 by Thomas Kinkade. Mr. Kinkade died on April 6, 2012 at the age of 54. He was deeply religious man and this portrait of his vision of Christ is a rare form of his artwork. The portrait is donated by Al and Kathy Hoffman to the greater glory of God and in thanksgiving for St. George’s church.
Thomas Kinkade (January 19, 1958 – April 6, 2012) was an American painter of popular realistic, bucolic, and idyllic subjects. He is notable for his printed reproductions and other licensed products via The Thomas Kinkade Company. He characterized himself as “Thomas Kinkade, Painter of Light,” a phrase he protected through trademark but one originally attributed to the English master J.M.W. Turner (1775–1851). He was claimed to be “America’s most-collected living artist” before his death.


CONSECRATION OF SUFFRUGAN BISHOPS

If you wish to attend the consecrations, please click this link.

SUMMER HAPPENINGS

Summer Theatre

When:
Thursday August 18, 5:00 PM – 11:30 PM
Where:
Spring Mountain Ranch, 6375 Highway 159, Blue Diamond, NV 89004
What:
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat

If you are interested in joining us for a picnic and show at Spring Mountain Ranch, please sign the clipboard on the patio. Mike & Kathy McKeag will a picnic supper (sandwiches, chips and drinks) from 6:00-7:00 pm. The theater gates open at 6:00 pm. The show begins at 8:00 pm. Tickets for the show including picnic are $15.00 per person. Children age 5 and under are admitted free.

The biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this newly-orchestrated musical parable. Joseph, his father’s favorite son, is a boy blessed with prophetic dreams. When he is sold into slavery by his jealous brothers and taken to Egypt, Joseph endures a series of adventures in which his spirit is continually challenged. He is purchased by Potiphar where thwarting advances from Potiphar’s wife lands him in jail. When news of Joseph’s gift to interpret dreams reaches the Pharaoh, Joseph is well on his way to becoming second in command. Eventually his brothers, having suffered greatly, unknowingly find themselves groveling at the feet of the brother they betrayed but no longer recognize. After testing their integrity, Joseph reveals himself leading to a heartfelt reconciliation of the sons of Israel. Set to an energetic rock score, this Old Testament tale has never been so much fun! Produced by Stage Door Entertainment. Directed and Choreographed by Terrence R. Williams. Join us for an evening under the stars. All shows will be at Spring Mountain Ranch.

Please contact the church office to reserve your tickets for this parish family social event. St. George’s parish will also serve a meal at the theatre prior to the show. More information about the play to follow in the coming weeks.  See you there!
FALL EVENTS

Saturday, Oct. 6th -
Saturday, Oct. 20th -
Sunday, Nov. 4th -
Sunday, Dec. 23rd -
Sunday, Dec. 23rd -
Feast of St. Francis with blessing of the animals service
Annual Parish Family Picnic, Lone Mountain Park
Art Auction
Annual Children’s Christmas Pageant
Annual Festival of Nine Lessons & Carols

WOULD YOU LIKE TO TAKE A PILGRIMAGE TO ENGLAND?

Are you interested in a Pilgrimage to England?

Do you long to hear the Big Ben bells? Swoon to the sound of evensong and candles? Savor warm scones and Devon cream? Love architecture and Anglican history? Parishioners Al and Kathy Hoffman are planning an Anglican Church-based pilgrimage to England for our church for next spring and they would love to hear who might be interested in going. They plan on 6-8 nights based in London but also visiting Canterbury, Bath, Salisbury and Stonehenge, PLUS this tour will be kept to around $1000 per person double-room occupancy including airfare.
Click for more info


FR. HINES CELEBRATES FIFTEENTH YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF HIS ORDINATION TO THE PRIESTHOOD

Father Gordon Hines

Fr. Hines was ordained a priest in 1997 on the Feast day of St. Irenaeus, June 28th. “I consider this quite a milestone,” said Fr. Hines. “Of the fifteen years as a priest, I have had the privilege of serving as Rector of St. George’s Church for fourteen years. I feel we have both grown together in the knowledge and love of Almighty God. I am very grateful for the vocation Our Lord has called me to.” Fr. Hines concluded his remarks by saying that the cry of the Church is for more priests and asked that we please pray daily for vocations to the Sacred Ministry.


SUNDAY SCHOOL CHILDREN WIN AWARDS AT DIOCESAN SYNOD ART CONTEST

Art Contest Winners

This year’s Diocesan Synod art contest drew good participation from our parish, with three of our children receiving Barnes and Noble Gift cards in recognition of their creative art work. Makena, Hailey and Cheyenne were the recipients of these gifts. In addition, other children from our Sunday school received ribbons and honorable mention. This year’s art contest theme was St. George slaying the dragon. No doubt, the children must have received inspiration from our parish’s patronal saint. Thanks are in order to Sunday school director Kim Jones and the other teachers for helping make this a successful and blessed event for our church school.